Visit to Newton’s Family Home at Woolsthorpe Manor on Saturday, 2 November

nigel

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Oct 2, 2019
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OU Student Societies Visit to Newton’s Family Home
at Woolsthorpe Manor on Saturday, 2 November

The OU Student Science and Maths Societies – Alchemy (Chemistry), Fusion (Physics), M500 (Maths and Statistics) – are organising a joint visit to Newton’s family home at Woolsthorpe Manor near Grantham, Lincolnshire on Saturday, 2 November at 14:00.

Newton was born at Woolsthorpe Manor and returned there during the plague years when he developed some of his most important work.
Please contact me, Nigel Patterson, at nigel@m500.org.uk if you are interested in attending.

For those travelling by train, the nearest station is Grantham which is on direct lines from Norwich, Nottingham and Sheffield. It can be reached from London and from the North by changing at Nottingham. Grantham Station is some 8 miles from Woolsthorpe Manor. The cost of taxi fare will be covered by the Societies (up to a maximum of 15), provided that you notify me of your intention to attend in advance. Please meet outside the station entrance at 13:15.

For those travelling by road, Woolsthorpe Manor is a short distance from the Woolsthorpe Junction (B64303) exit from the A1.

Woolsthorpe Manor is owned and managed by the National Trust and so, if you are a member, please bring your National Trust Membership card. The cost of entrance to Woolsthorpe Manor is £8.80. The Societies will cover the entrance cost of the first 10 people to notify me in advance.

The event is open to all OU students, whether you are studying science and maths or not. Family and friends are also welcome, although we are only able to subsidise OU students. Please note that all under 18s must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Best wishes, Nigel

Okay, so this is not strictly philosophy. But Newton was a big influence upon John Locke, who regarded his own work as that of the under gardener, and the object of Bishop George Berkeley's polemic The Analyst.